JRR Artist FAQ - Frequently Asked Questions | Listen to online Jewish Radio and Jewish Music
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Jewish Rock Radio


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JRR Artist FAQ - Frequently Asked Questions

Why is Jewish Rock Radio revolutionary for both new and established Jewish rock artists?How can artists advertise on JRR?How does Jewish Rock Radio pay artists?What kind of music does JRR accept?  Who decides what music is played on Jewish Rock Radio?How does an artist (established artist, new artist, or a cappella group) submit music to Jewish Rock Radio?After I submit my music, how long does it take for the JRR Youth Advisory Board to determine selection?Am I an "Emerging" or "Established" ArtistCan I resubmit the same songs for consideration?How do I submit my recorded music to CD Distributors?How do I copyright my music?What is an ID3 Tag and how do I properly ID3 Tag my songs? How do I make and sell sheet music?
Why is Jewish Rock Radio revolutionary for both new and established Jewish rock artists?

In the secular and Christian worlds, fans are exposed to artists, their music,  and their merchandise through mass communication channels such as television and radio and extensive live concert tours by the artists.  There are thousands of secular and Christian radio stations that expose and promote the careers of artists.  There are also thousands of stores that distribute their merchandise (i.e. CDs, clothing, etc).


In the Jewish world, there are VERY few opportunities for Jewish artists to be exposed on television or radio to promote their music or merchandise or to develop a demand among the Jewish masses for live performances.  Jewish Rock Radio is the "missing link" in the Jewish world that provides a mass communication channel exposing and promoting Jewish rock artists.  Jewish Rock Radio also goes a step further by creating featured new and established artist profiles on www.jewishrockradio.com so visitors can learn much more about the artist and find out where to buy the artist's merchandise.   This is a good thing!


Finally, Jewish Rock Radio is committed to supporting Jewish music distributors who sell Jewish music, educating the public about OySongs.com, Soundswrite.com, and other distributors who promote Jewish music.

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How can artists advertise on JRR?

By advertising on Jewish Rock Radio, established and emerging Jewish music artists have the opportunity to get their name and message in front of thousands of loyal and highly engaged Jewish listeners.  As a vibrant digital home of Jewish culture and engagement, Jewish Rock Radio offers a scope and reach that is far greater than most print and website platforms available in the Jewish world.
 
JRR professionals can customize an advertising packagewithin your budget that synchronizes a combination of JRR platforms including:
- On-air sponsor spots
- Custom, sponsor-branded website banners on www.jewishrockradio.com
- Custom, sponsor-branded banner on Jewish Rock Radio iPhone and Android mobile phone applications
 
Click here to download the JRR advertising/sponsorship packet with detailed information about powerful Jewish Rock Radio sponsorship benefits and opportunities.
 
Contact Rachel Brown, director of JRR sponsorship, at 314.210.4419 or [email protected] for more information about your marketing goals.

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How does Jewish Rock Radio pay artists?

Jewish Rock Radio is fully committed to strictly adhere with all US laws and regulations regarding the broadcast of music and talk via the Internet Radio stations pay fees for the rights to broadcast music. Fees are paid to licensing bodies such as Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI), SESAC, and the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP). Radio stations calculate payment to license holders by periodically auditing the music being played. The audit results are submitted to the licensing relevant body for the station's territory. This information is used to calculate the average number of plays each artist has received. 

 

Jewish Rock Radio employs a company called Live365 that provides a “one-stop” service providing bandwidth, broadcasting tools, and music licensing for performing rights organizations including ASCAP, BMI, and SESAC. The owner of the copyright in a sound recording owns the exclusive right to publicly perform the recording through a digital transmission, such as over the Internet. Therefore, Webcasters must also obtain a public performance license for each sound recording they play. In the United States, SoundExchange is the Performing Rights Organization that provides public performance licenses for the Webcasting (streaming) of sound recordings. SoundExchange collects license fees and distributes royalties to record labels (the majors, as well as independent and artist-owned labels), the featured recording artist and the backing musicians who contribute to the recordings. Under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act ("DMCA"), Webcasters are entitled to these licenses only if their playlists comply with certain requirements, called the "sound recording complement." For example, songs cannot be available on demand, and no more than four songs by an artist can be streamed on the same station within any three-hour period. Information about SoundExchange is available here. For proper tracking, all artists who desire payment for the public performance of their work(s) on Jewish Rock Radio or any other radio station must register with ASCAP, BMI, or SESAC. 

For more information on how ASCAP pays their artists, click here.

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What kind of music does JRR accept?  

Jewish Rock Radio accepts music submissions of all types and genres of Jewish music or music created by Jewish artists.  JRR will not play music with anti-Semitic, racist, sexist, violent text, Christian, Christian-messianic, or from any faith community other than Judaism.

 

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Who decides what music is played on Jewish Rock Radio?

The JRR Youth Advisory Board (tweens and high school-aged youth) and the JRR Senior Youth Advisory Board (college-aged and post-college twenty-something) determine the selection of music played on Jewish Rock Radio.  JRR utilizes a confidential online music jukebox to expose Youth Advisory Board members to a wide variety of Jewish music for their consideration.  Through a blind survey process, JRR Youth Advisory board members report their selections, favorite Jewish artists, and offer a wide-range of feedback on a variety of topics surrounding Jewish Rock Radio.  JRR also receives musical feedback and suggestions from a variety of sources through the www.jewishrockradio.com website request form and by word of mouth.

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How does an artist (established artist, new artist, or a cappella group) submit music to Jewish Rock Radio?

Please fill out the Artist Submission Form and your music will be presented to members of the JRR Youth Advisory Board for consideration. CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT YOUR MUSIC

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After I submit my music, how long does it take for the JRR Youth Advisory Board to determine selection?

There is a revolving music submission cycle, so there is no set amount of time for selection of the artists that will be broadcast on JRR.  It could take days or months.  Please free to check on the status of your music submission no less than 1 month after your initial submission by writing [email protected].

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Am I an "Emerging" or "Established" Artist
Jewish Rock Radio features an emerging artist spot on the JRR on-air broadcast playing a song of a newer artist. JRR also creates and extensive emerging artist profile on www.jewishrockradio.com to promote and help develop careers of newer, up-and-coming Jewish artists. JRR uses a combination of criteria to distinguish between and emerging and established artist. These criteria include but are not limited to:
  • Number of professional recordings released
  • Length of career as a professional Jewish musician
  • Fan base
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Can I resubmit the same songs for consideration?

If the JRR Youth Advisory Board chooses to not broadcast the music from your initial submission, it is highly recommended that you review the JRR Youth Advisory Board ‘JRR Music Selection Standards’ and resubmit different music selections.

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How do I submit my recorded music to CD Distributors?

There are numerous outlets for your artist recordings, both in digital and physical distribution, in and out of the organized Jewish world.  In the Jewish world, there are a few predominant distributors/publishers to whom you can submit your recordings or music catalog:

oySongs.com: The leading digital download site for Jewish music. The majority of artists played on Jewish Rock Radio sell their digital downloads on oySongs. You can also sell your sheet music at oySongs.  Click the ‘Become an oySongs Artist’ link at the bottom of any oySongs.com page to sign up.
 
Soundswrite.com: Sounds Write Productions is one of the leaders in Jewish world physical CD sales.  Many artists played on Jewish Rock Radio sell their physical CDs at Soundswrite.com. Visit www.soundswrite.com/pages.php?pageid=14 to learn how to submit your music.
 
Jewishmusic.com: Tara Publications sells songbooks and CDs and specializes in traditional Jewish music. Visit http://jewishmusic.com/
 
Mostlymusic.com: An orthodox music publisher and distributor. Visit http://www.mostlymusic.com/
 
To distribute your music secularly, we recommend signing up for CD Baby (members.cdbaby.com) where you can sell your CDs and digital downloads.  Visit http://members.cdbaby.com/ to learn how to submit your music. Cdbaby also provides a direct connection to iTunes and other major online retailer including Amazon. 
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How do I copyright my music?
A copyright is the sole legal right of the author of an original literary, visual, or audio work to use, license, or copy that work. Copyrights granted after January 1, 1978 last for the lifetime of the author plus an additional 50 years.
 
In the music industry, an author can copyright either the song (intellectual property), or the specific recording of that song, or both.
Once you put your music into tangible form (i.e. sheet music or a recording), you technically have a legitimate copyright over that work. However, it is prudent to take additional steps to establish proof that you are the holder of that copyright in case of a dispute. Some people try the “poor man’s copyright” by putting the tangible work into a sealed envelope, mailing it to themselves, and leaving it sealed as proof. Should they find themselves in a dispute, this would be their only evidence.
 
To truly protect yourself, establish more substantive proof, obtain the backing of the US government, and potentially save yourself a lot of time and headaches, it is best to register your work with the US Copyright Office. Registering with the Copyright office is quick and easy and can be done online or through the mail. To learn more, visit www.copyright.gov/register. Keep in mind, it costs a minimum of $35, and though your copyright is registered the second it is received (and properly filled out), it may take anywhere from 10 weeks to 8 months to receive your copyright certificate.  For further information regarding copyrights, you might also consider seeking  professional counsel from an attorney specializing in copyright law or a general practice attorney with knowledge in basic copyright law.
 
Tips:
  • Registering online is quicker and cheaper than paper forms.
  • You can register one copyright for a collection of songs (i.e. an album)
  • If you want to copyright just the intellectual property (i.e. sheet music), use form PA. If you want to copyright just the specific recording of that intellectual property, or if you want to make one registration for both the recording and the intellectual property, use form SR. Please note that the copyright applicant must be the same for both the recording and intellectual property in order to complete one registration for both the recording and intellectual property.
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What is an ID3 Tag and how do I properly ID3 Tag my songs?

An ID3 Tag is a simple way of referring to how we name our songs in media playing programs like iTunes.  You often see ID3 Tags identifying the songs title, artist name, album title, etc.

  1. Open iTunes, and locate the song in your library that you wish to update ID3 Tag information.  

  2. Right-click (or control-click for Mac users) the file, and choose “Get Info” (you may also left-click the file and then hit Control + I for Windows users or Command + I for Mac users).  A window will appear.  Click the tab named “Info.”  Once in this tab, you will see several fields in which you may enter or change information such as Artist name, Album name, Album artist, etc.

  3. Add the ID3 information so that the information is how you want to public to see it .  Once complete, click “OK” and your information will be saved. (For music that is submitted to Jewish Rock Radio, songs files need to be submitted in mp3 format at 128 bit rate.  To do this, go to "Preferences" located in the toolbar.  Under "General Settings," click "Import Settings." In the Import Settings, make sure the file format is set to mp3 and the bit rate is at 128).  


***For an album you have just created and would like ID tags to appear when a listener places the CD in their computer for the first time, follow these instructions:

  1. Open iTunes, and place CD in your CD drive.

  2. Once your CD has been recognized by iTunes (you will know this by the CD appearing on the left-hand side of the screen and the tracks named as Track 1, Track 2, etc), right-click (or control-click for Mac users) a file, and choose “Get Info” (you may also left-click the file and then hit Control + I for Windows users or Command + I for Mac users).  A window will appear.  Click the tab named “Info.”  Once in this tab, you will see several fields in which you may enter or change information such as Artist name, Album name, Album artist, etc.

  3. Add the ID3 information as you wish.  Once complete, click “OK” and your information will be saved. Complete steps 2 and 3 for each track on your album.

  4. Once all information is as you like it, highlight all tracks.  Then go to your toolbar and click “Advanced” and select “Submit CD Track Names.”  Your ID3 tags will then be sent to the Gracenotes database (Gracenotes is a company that offers advanced media identification to programs such as iTunes  For example, when you import a CD to iTunes, Gracenotes will search its database and correctly identify the information on the CD as you import it).  Allow a couple days for your ID3 tags to take effect.

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How do I make and sell sheet music?

Sheet music is still a very important means of dissemination of music in the Jewish world. Cantors, soloists, rabbis, and educators all use sheet music to learn new or older tunes appropriate for a particular season, holiday, theme, or lesson.  If you write liturgical music, it is particularly important to offer your music in professionally-transcribed form in addition to your recording.  Sheet music provides an accessible format for your music to be shared with congregations and communities throughout the world.  
 
The two leading music engravers in the Jewish arena are Joe Eglash, of Eglash Creative Group (www.EglashCreative.com, [email protected]) and Eric Komar (www.KomarMusic.com, [email protected]).  (Joe Eglash also owns oySongs.com – if you sign up as an oySongs artist, you will receive a discount on transcription of your music.)  They can offer you the highest-quality transcription from your recording.
 
Aside from self-distribution, you can sell your sheet music on oySongs.com and secular sites like www.lala.com or www.sibeliusmusic.com.  Publishers like Transcontinental Music Publications (www.TranscontinentalMusic.com) and Tara Publications (www.JewishMusic.com) may consider your music too.

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